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Species of Spaces: Writing about the Built Environment (The Realistic)
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Organizing Committee:

The title of the class comes from Georges Perec's book Species of Spaces. Perec writes, "This is how space begins, with words only, signs traced on the blank page." Over three sessions, this workshop will examine ways of describing space with words. To inspire new writings about spaces, readings will be assigned and serve as points of departure for group discussion and written output.

 

The second class will be devoted to The Realistic.

 

We will start discussion by talking about the state of architecture criticism; participants should take a look at the discussion on Urban Omnibus (http://urbanomnibus.net/tag/criticism/).



Conversation will then look at how realistic writing succeeds or fails when confronted with an emotionally charged space. A local example is the controversy over Brooklyn Yards.



Perhaps read:
 http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/21/arts/design/21atla.html
http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2006/10/16/061016crsk_skyline
http://www.opinionjournal.com/la/?id=110006852

 

The class will also discuss questions such as: does architecture criticism move the field forward, or simply divide the starchitects from the non starchitects? How does the straightforward, journalistic approach to writing conflict with the theory-laden project summaries often found on architects' websites?

 

Teachers

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maria ibanez de sendadiano's picture

Class Reminder: Tomorrow

Species of Spaces: Writing about the Built Environment (The Realistic)
Class Led by Diana Lind

November 16, 2009 at 6:30pm
Van Alen Institute, 30 West 22nd Street, 6th floor, NY, NY

dianamlind's picture

Hi,

I should also note that this particular section of the class is specifically concerned with architectural criticism and reviews. It will be a discussion about the intersection of mainstream architectural journalism and architecture itself — fairly different from the types of readings for last class and for the next class.

I will be referencing these pieces as well. (And may have a few updates between now and Monday -- sorry to be sending this out so late.)

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/20/arts/design/20tull.html?scp=1&sq=alice...
http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/skyline/2009/02/02/090202crsk_skyl...

maria ibanez de sendadiano's picture

Below are some additional notes to the class description provided by Diana Lind. Please see the proposed readings as well:

We will start the discussion by talking about the state of architecture criticism; participants should begin by reading a few thoughts shared on Urban Omnibus (http://urbanomnibus.net/tag/criticism/).

Conversation will then look at how realistic writing succeeds or fails when confronted with an emotionally charged space. A local example is the controversy over Brooklyn Yards.

Perhaps read:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/21/arts/design/21atla.html
http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2006/10/16/061016crsk_skyline
http://www.opinionjournal.com/la/?id=110006852

The class will also discuss questions such as: does architecture criticism move the field forward, or simply divide the starchitects from the non starchitects? How does the straightforward, journalistic approach to writing conflict with the theory-laden project summaries often found on architects' websites?

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